Author: Haider Donnelly

Faucet Repair Tips

Faucets are typically made from a combination of forged or machined parts. The machining process shapes the faucet body to fit the design and finish.

Faucet Repair

Shut off the water and remove the handle screw using an Allen wrench or a screwdriver. Gently pry off the decorative cap and expose the screw. For professional help, contact Plumbing Express, Inc. now!

When a faucet starts dripping it’s important to get the problem fixed as quickly as possible. Otherwise, it’ll only continue to drip and waste water. One of the first things to do is check that all the screws are tight. If they’re loose, it’s a simple fix and the problem will stop. Another common cause of leaking faucets is an internal part that’s damaged or worn. This can be anything from a rubber O-ring to the inner cartridge. A professional will be able to diagnose the issue and replace the necessary parts.

If your leaky faucet is originating from the spout itself, it’s likely caused by a corroded valve seat. This is an issue that can often be avoided with regular maintenance and inspections by a professional plumber. The valve seat connects the spout to the compression assembly, and over time sediment can build up and start corroding it. This leads to leaks around the spout and other issues.

A leaky spout could also be caused by the washer, which rests against the valve seat and wears down over time from friction. The washer can wear out from being too large or because it’s been installed incorrectly. A professional plumber can replace the washer with the correct size and prevent further problems.

Leaking from the handle is usually a sign of a worn out gasket or O-ring. The gasket is a small rubber ring that fits between the handle and the base of the faucet. Over time, it can become hard and brittle from constant use, or it can just lose its grip and start to leak. Replacing the gasket is a simple process, and a skilled plumber will be able to do it in no time.

A leak from the cartridge can be difficult to diagnose, but it’s important to address it as soon as possible to avoid further damage. This type of leak is most commonly caused by a broken O-ring, but it can also be the result of a damaged cartridge or a valve seat that’s not seated correctly. Depending on the model of faucet, a qualified technician may be able to disassemble it and inspect all the components for any damage.

Dripping

Dripping faucets can waste gallons of water every year. In addition, the constant dripping can drive up your utility bills. Thankfully, the problem is fairly easy to fix. You can usually solve it by replacing the rubber or neoprene seals, washers, and O-rings. If the issue persists, it may be time to call a plumber for professional help.

The first step is to shut off the water supply at the point where the faucet handles connect to the valves. Next, remove the decorative caps on each handle. You’ll find screws underneath that fasten the handle to the stem. Once you’ve removed the caps, use a flathead screwdriver to loosen and remove the handle screw. If you’re having trouble removing the screw, try using penetrating oil to break up any rust or sediment trapped inside.

After removing the handle, you can begin to inspect and replace the other parts that might be causing leaks. Depending on the type of faucet you have, these include O-rings, washers, and valve seat. Inspect each of these for damage, wear, or corrosion. Once you’ve replaced these parts, you can start reassembling the faucet. Remember to work backwards so you don’t forget any steps.

Before reassembling your faucet, make sure to cover the drain with a towel or old T-shirt. Small faucet parts are prone to falling down the drain, so covering it will prevent them from getting lost in your pipes. Also, it’s a good idea to have a pair of pliers on hand to help you grasp any small components.

After you’ve replaced the O-ring, washer, and valve seat, you can reassemble your faucet. Remember to use the proper order of replacements so you don’t get a new leak. The order should be washer, O-ring, stem, packing nut, screw, and handle. Once you’ve reassembled your faucet, turn the knob to test it for any remaining leaks. If it still drips, you might need to replace the adjusting ring or the nut. Finally, you can add a new retainer ring or sand the valve seat to smooth it out and avoid future leaks.

Mineral buildup

If you notice white, chalky deposits forming around your faucet and showerheads, it’s not dried toothpaste—it’s calcium buildup. Water that contains a high level of calcium salts is called “hard water” and while it’s generally safe to drink, it can be rough on pipes, fixtures, fabrics, and skin. The whitish stains and soap scum associated with hard water aren’t just unsightly; they can also restrict water flow.

Over time, this can narrow the size of the pipe, resulting in decreased water pressure and an increased likelihood of leaks. It can also cause the internal components of your water heater, washing machine, dishwasher, and other appliances to wear out faster. In addition, corrosive elements can form on metal surfaces that affect their appearance, as well as lead to a loss of functionality.

Luckily, there are some easy and inexpensive ways to combat these problems. One of the best methods is simply to soak a sandwich-sized plastic bag in vinegar and secure it around any problem areas (such as your showerhead or drains). For the parts you can’t reach with a plastic bag, use strips of paper towel soaked in vinegar and secure them with rubber bands. Allow these to sit for an hour before removing them and wiping the area clean.

Alternatively, you can use a commercial cleaner or muriatic acid to eat away at the residue. Be sure to use protective gloves when handling any chemicals and always work in a ventilated area. To help prevent future mineral buildup, consider investing in a water softener system for your home. These systems reduce the amount of minerals like calcium that enter your house’s plumbing and end up on your sinks and faucets. You can also find a number of home and commercial water filters online that eliminate hard water residue completely. These are also a great way to save money on your energy bill by reducing the amount of water that is heated and circulated throughout your home. This can make a major difference to your wallet and the environment. If you’re interested in learning more about how a water filter or softening system can benefit your home, contact your local plumbers today.

Coloured water

When your faucets spout out water that’s a murky yellow or brown color, you might be worried about the safety of your water. But this is often not the case, especially if your water comes from the city or other public source. In fact, coloured tap water can actually be a good thing. Coloured water is an indication that your plumbing has more of the minerals and nutrients that are important for human health. It also means that the water is free from toxins and other harmful substances.

One of the most common reasons that your water turns a funny color is rust. If you live in an older home, your pipes might be made of galvanized iron or steel. These pipes have a protective zinc layer that wears away over time. As the rust flakes off and mixes with the water, it changes its color to a yellowish-red or brown. This is usually not harmful and will resolve itself over time. You can test the color of your water by running a few glasses of it and comparing them to each other.

If your water is brown in only one or more of your faucets and it doesn’t clear up after you run a few glasses, you should call your local utility company. They may have been working nearby and inadvertently stirred up sediment that is contaminating the water supply. They will likely tell you that the problem is temporary and that your water should clear up soon.

Another possible cause of coloured tap water is copper. If your water is yellow or orange and you’ve recently installed copper plumbing, it could be a sign that the copper is leaching into the water. In this case, you should run a glass of hot and cold water to see if the discoloration disappears.

If your water is yellow in all of your faucets, the problem is most likely with your pipes or water heater. It might be a simple fix, but you will need to have a plumber find the source of the issue and repair it.

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